Changes to the Taylor Law

//Changes to the Taylor Law

Changes to the Taylor Law

TAYLOR LAW CHANGES ARE BIG WIN FOR CSEA

The governor and legislature passed legislation during the state budget process that changes the Taylor Law in an effort to help fortify unions against the impending implications of Janus v. AFSCME Council 31.

NeverQuit-LogoDuty of Fair Representation Limited
The most important change to the Taylor Law relates to the Duty of Fair Representation. As we prepare for the likelihood that the Supreme Court is going to allow non-members to benefit from union representation without having to contribute, this is a big win for us. The new legislation provides that public employee unions will not have to provide representation to non-members in any disciplinary cases as well as any legal, economic, or job related services beyond those provided in the collective bargaining agreement.

New Employee Information Within 30 Days
The new legislation also states that public employers must notify an employee organization of new employees, and provide the following, within 30 days of employment:

  • name;
  • address;
  • job title;
  • employing agency, department or other operating unit; and
  • work location.

Public employers must also allow a duly appointed representative to meet with new employees at the work site during work time for a reasonable amount of time without requiring employees to charge leave time. Additionally, employee organizations are now permitted to use electronic membership cards.

Members Returning from Leave to Same Employer Stay Members
One other significant change to the Taylor Law addresses the “churn” problem that has occurred when members have gone out on voluntary or involuntary leave and been reinstated as agency fee payers upon their return. Now, when members return to the same employer after voluntary or involuntary leave, they will return as members and the right to deduct dues will be automatically reinstated.

These changes to the Taylor Law are a significant victory in our ongoing effort to ensure our union stays strong regardless of the outcome of Janus v. AFSCME Council 31.

2018-05-15T15:10:09+00:00